Antique Stone Wall – Windsor, CT

Antique Stone Wall – Windsor, Ct

At this home in Windsor, CT we return to build an antique stone wall to line the back edge of the property.  A stone wall for the front of the property was built by us in previous years.  This property is the main house to an old tobacco plantation on the Connecticut River.  The house has a lot of history and the owners are looking for walls that look the part and compliment the historic property.   We use weathered fieldstone which is carefully selected from existing walls off a farm in Massachusettes.  The weathered stone will give the new wall an immediate antique look, and we will drystack it in the traditional method.  The result will be a classic looking stone wall that the owners will be able to enjoy for many years to come.

First we clear brush in the area of the new wall and excavate the base.  We lay compacted gravel as the base and start building the wall.  We use the weathered/lichen-y side of the stones whenever possible, and finish the wall off with precise cap line.  The result is a very sharp but classic looking wall to compliment the property.  The new wall will provide a nice view from the back patio, and help define the edge of the property.

Antique Stone Wall

Antique Stone Wall

Antique Stone Wall

Antique Stone Wall

Antique Stone Wall

Antique Stone Wall

Antique Stone Wall

Antique Stone Wall

Antique Stone Wall

Antique Stone Wall

Antique Stone Wall

Antique Stone Wall

Stone Firepit + Patio – Concord, MA

Stone Firepit + Patio – Concord, MA

The owners of this home in Concord, MA are doing some work on their property and are looking to add a field stone firepit and seating area as well.   A firepit is a great addition to any yard, letting you enjoy the outdoors after the sun has gone down or the weather turns cold.

Stone Firepit – Design

The firepit will be made from local fieldstone outside, with firebrick on the inside.  Firebrick is a special type of brick that is resistant to heat.  The brick will take all the heat from the fire and protect the stone which could crack or pop loose if heated too much.  The firebrick adds a step but ensures a long lasting installation. 

The patio surrounding the firepit will be made from bluestone flagging.  It will be fit fairly tight and form a rough circle around the firepit.  About 5′ or 6′ feet of space from the firepit to the edge of the patio provides enough room for Adirondack chairs which are a popular outdoor seating option.  Together the fieldstone and the bluestone flagging will provide a very natural, authentic look.

We lay out the design with some ground paint and get started on the prep work.

Design

Stone Firepit – Installation

First we excavate and prep the base, and refine the placement of the patio and firepit.  Using intersecting lines we find the center and work out from there.

The bluestone flagging comes on a pallet with large irregular slabs of bluestone.  It is an attractive stone that varies in color and thickness and shape.  It needs to be cut and shaped to fit, and leveled one by one.  The process is labor intensive but is a unique look that can’t be beat.

Prep

 

Bluestone Flagging

We mark a circle by running a line from a stake at the center point and then build up the firebrick.  We will use two rows of firebrick stood on end, and give it a 2.5′ inside diameter with a finish height of 1.5′.  

Stone Firepit - Prep

Stone Firepit – Prep

Stone Firepit - Prep

Stone Firepit – Prep

Once the firebrick is in, we build the fieldstone the outside, and then install the surrounding patio.  The bluestone is cut and shaped so that they fit together with roughly 3/4″ – 1″ joints.  The result is an attractive feature for the yard and an inviting seating area for entertaining friends or relaxing nights. 

Stone Firepit + Patio

Stone Firepit + Patio

Stone Firepit + Patio

Stone Firepit + Patio

 

 

Stone Mailbox – Lincoln, MA

Stone Mailbox – Lincoln, MA

At this home in Lincoln, MA we are building a stone mailbox surround.  The column will be built entirely of stone and will surround a stainless steel mailbox.  Power will also be routed so a light can eventually go on top, and bluestone number plates will be included on the sides.

The material we will use is called Colonial Wallstone.  It is the same material as Bluestone and is generally the irregular cast of pieces from the bluestone quarries.  It can be called ‘stack stone’ or ‘thin stack’ as well and gives a neat, clean, and modern look.

Stone Mailbox Construction:

To build the stone mailbox column we first dig 2′ deep, pour concrete for a base, and install electrical conduits.  We then prep for the column by making a template and stretching plumb lines to the ground.  We use a stack of cinder blocks for the template to rest on.  Once the stone mailbox column is prepped we can start building up with our wallstone.  The stone is not a veneer, but full bed stone.  The stones are mortared, and the middle of the column is filled with concrete/mortar.

Stone Mailbox - Prep

Mailbox – Prep

Stone Mailbox - Construction

Mailbox – Construction

 

The process is slow going as there are four corners and not much space in between them.  The stones will look natural in the end but often need to be cut or trimmed to fit. We aim for a mix of sizes, level stones, but with varied courses.  The number plate is the same type of stone but cut from a bluestone paver.  The numbers will be drilled and attached later.

Stone Mailbox - Construction

Mailbox – Construction

Stone Mailbox - Construction

Construction

Stone Mailbox - Construction

Construction

The stone mailbox reaches final height and we are ready for the cap stone and numbers.  The cap stone is also bluestone, has a slight overhang, and gives the column a more finished look.

 

Stone Mailbox - Lincoln, MA

Stone Mailbox – Lincoln, MA

Stone Mailbox - Lincoln, MA

Stone Mailbox – Lincoln, MA